Posts Tagged Technology

I am Human: Random Complaint About Security Checks

Almost anyone who has spent any amount of time on the Internet has had to deal with those stupid security checks where you are required to “type the above text” to prove that you are a human and not some automated robot.

I tend to get a little perturbed with these tests as they are actually very difficult to read at times!  In fact, I’ve had to re-type the above words three or four times before because I was repeatedly presented with a group of letters where one or two of the symbols could have easily been a couple different letters.

This is a little upsetting because I feel as if the computer is telling me that I am not a human!  I’m a human, dammit, now let me use your website!

If you enjoyed this mini-rant, you might enjoy a longer rant of mine.

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Is Technology an Entirely Positive Thing?

Based on my experience, it seems to me that many people  have a very positive view of technology, seeing it as an  avenue to less work and more fun. I feel that much of  technology today is made with the intention of helping  people, and succeeds in many ways, but also has negative side  effects or potential future consequences that are easy to  overlook or not consider.

The nuclear bomb development “helped” the United States win an arms race but also killed hundreds of thousands of people in Japan and has put very deadly weapons in the hands of unpredictable dictators. Televisions, gaming  consoles, and other home entertainment equipment have helped people to not be bored for decades but have also increased obesity and sedentary lifestyles, cut down on appreciation for nature, reduced actual human interaction, and most distressingly planted some very distorted world views in the minds of millions of American youth. Read the rest of this entry »

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Ranting About Technology and the Modern Public Education System

Reflecting on the role of phones in society, I’m appalled at the importance this little device has in all aspects of life for the typical American.

In fact, it’s even reasonable to consider that in most cases
No phone=No friends
No phone=No job
No phone=Alienation

What are the consequences of wanting to “unplug” per se? Read the rest of this entry »

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26 Years to Learn a Trade?

In today’s world, we are going to school for longer and longer all the time.  Back when my parents were younger, a high school diploma was considered the status quo for education documentation as far as the majority of the job market is concerned.  Nowadays, that document is the college degree.  For now, the overwhelming majority seem to be pursuing undergraduate bachelors degrees, but for how long?  An increasing number of jobs have competitive markets that require Grad School, Law School, Med School, or any other form of extra schooling.  Some professions even require another 8 years after the completion of your undergrad.  That means that you’ll be 30 years old, having been going to school for 26 years (if you started in pre-school) just to gain enough knowledge and experience to be a specialized surgeon or orthodontist.

With the technology of today’s world expanding at rate faster than ever, how will the amount of necessary schooling look 25 years ago for my kids?  Is the typical college student in my children’s generation going to have to go to school until they’re 26 just to have a chance in a dog eat dog job market for high skill/high paying jobs?  I don’t know where it’s going to end.  Already, the demand for high-skill jobs in engineering is greater than the number of adequately skilled Americans to fill the positions.  Large numbers of highly skilled workers from foreign countries come to the United States to fill these positions.  What happens when this is the case across the board because the majority of Americans don’t have the time, money, or intellect to pursue high skill degrees?  I think what will happen is a higher unemployment rate.  Eventually, we need to realize that fast-advancing technology may not be an entirely positive change in society.

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